New Post has been published on Vdoop.com

New Post has been published on http://vdoop.com/knauf-and-brown-helps-users-consciously-engage-everyday-objects/

knauf and brown helps users consciously engage everyday objects

the collection of lamps, coasters, and mirrors has been conceived around a philosophy of heightened appreciation for tools we use on a daily basis.

The post knauf and brown helps users consciously engage everyday objects appeared first on designboom | architecture & design magazine.

New Post has been published on Vdoop.com

New Post has been published on http://vdoop.com/making-some-realistic-garlic-using-photoshop/

Making some Realistic Garlic using Photoshop

Photoshop allows you to create any object, you can choose any object or commodities. This tutorial will show you to make some garlic on the chopping board. The idea is like other 3D objects, in which, you need to create shadow and reflection for the object.

(View This Tutorial)

New Post has been published on Vdoop.com

New Post has been published on http://vdoop.com/7-smart-ways-to-hide-storage/

7 Smart Ways to Hide Storage

7 Smart Ways to Hide Storage

These tips for camouflaging storage space will keep your compact home feeling clean and uncluttered.

Hidden wall cabinets in bathroom

Building storage behind walls is a surefire way to decrease clutter. In the bathroom of a tiny Chelsea co-op, towel racks pull down to reveal hampers hidden behind the blue-tiled wall.

New Post has been published on Vdoop.com

New Post has been published on http://vdoop.com/chilled-red-bell-pepper-and-habanero-soup/

Chilled Red Bell Pepper and Habanero Soup

brought to you by epicurious.com and NutritionData.com

Calories 211; Total Fat 15g; Carbohydrates 18g

This low-calorie, spicy chilled soup will have you craving seconds—and since it has only 211 calories per serving, feel free to indulge. Chili peppers, such as the habañeros in this soup, have a strongly anti-inflammatory compound known as capsaicin, which has been found to help with blood coagulation and may reduce arthritis pain and psoriasis symptoms. A side note to the daring: The hotter the chili pepper, the more capsaicin it contains, and habeñeros pack a wallop. Pair with grilled chicken or fish, and have some soothing Strawberry Buttermilk Ice for dessert.

Go to the healthy recipe on epicurious.com

Photograph By: Romulo Yanes

Nutritional Information

Amounts per serving plus the % Daily Value (DV) based on a 2,000 calorie diet:

  • 211 Calories (11%)
  • 15g Total fat (23%)
  • 2g Saturated Fat (10%)
  • 0mg Cholesterol (0%)
  • 523mg Sodium (22%)
  • 18g Carbohydrate (6%)
  • 4g Fiber (18%)
  • 5g Protein (10%)

See the full nutritional analysis from NutritionData.com

More Healthy Recipes



New Post has been published on Vdoop.com

New Post has been published on http://vdoop.com/tips-for-designing-a-beautiful-single-page-portfolio-website/

Tips for Designing a Beautiful Single-Page Portfolio Website


Advertise here with BSA

Many trends in general web design can also be applied to single page layouts. But there are some unique features to the lone webpage which can add more flavor into a design. Like most of the web design field, common sense and user experience always trumps inessential creative ideas.

But that doesn’t mean anybody can just understand the best techniques for creating a single page design. In this post I’d like to share a few ideas on how to create usable, tactile portfolios with content featured on a single page. Mobile users are growing rapidly so you have to be thinking about clickable and swipeable interfaces at all times.

Fixed Block Scrolling

When all the website content is fitted onto a single page you can break down each section into horizontal blocks. As the user scrolls vertically they pass by each section denoted through background colors, images, or even horizontal rule breaks. This idea can be expanded with forced scrolling sections.

zack batsaikhan digital product designer website portfolio

The personal portfolio of Zack Batsaikhan demonstrates this effect brilliantly. Scrolling even 1 notch down will automatically animate to the next section. His website also supports navigating with the arrow keys so you can jump between sections and even go through his portfolio entries without a mouse or trackpad.

jeya karthika parallax website layout scrolling effect

Another designer Jeya Karthika has this same effect using split background colors. It’s especially nice for mobile users who need to swipe down between sections. To create this type of portfolio you would typically use a jQuery plugin for parallax scrolling. But it’s also possible to create your own with just a bit of JavaScript.

Responsive Design

Coupled with the importance of mobile support includes naturally responsive layouts. RWD isn’t a new concept, but the implementation is still in a growth & research phase. Designers are constantly playing around with new ideas for responsive web design. Portfolios are even more important because they represent your work quality and even some tidbits about yourself.

andrew shen portfolio responsive website design

Andrew Shen has a great responsive portfolio which adjusts the content and navigation menu. The hamburger toggle icon has become a staple among UX designers to convey a clickable button for showing & hiding a menu. His website is simple and would render perfectly on any sized mobile screen.

dennis field simple portfolio website layout

Comparing with another website by Dennis Field you’ll notice many similarities. Content is broken down into horizontal sections which then retract based on the browser width. But interestingly enough, Dennis’ portfolio hides the navigation beyond a certain point. Instead users move between page sections with arrows scrolling dynamically with jQuery. Each approach has its own benefits so think about your end result when building responsive traits.

There will always be a few responsive techniques you want to include on any site. Responsive images and collapsable thumbnail galleries will be necessary. Also think about breakpoint dimensions and when you should be resizing fonts to fit neatly on the screen.

Animations & Effects

A bit of charm in your single page portfolio will capture more attention if done correctly. There is a limit where visitors will not put up with your outrageous animations – but a neat balance will give the effect of dynamic and creative design talents.

keele web design ux agency website layout

The design studio for Keele has a bunch of neat page animations. Whether you find this beyond your acceptable limit is really subjective. But even if you don’t like all of these effects there is a lot to learn from their website. Notably the navigation hover effects coupled with the expanding logo really catch your attention right off the bat.

karol krakowiak designer developer animated portfolio website

Instead of interface animations you might try animating images or page content instead. The portfolio of Karol Krakowiak does this as you scroll throughout her work samples. If you can build the animations with jQuery everything should run smooth even on a mobile device. There is no scientific formula for making catchy page animations – just try some stuff and see what you like the most.

Hidden Sliding Navigation

The topic of navigation seems a bit confusing on a single page website. Since a one page portfolio has no inner pages(or very few), the nav links create auto-scrolling behavior. So basically users will click a link and it scrolls down to that section of the page.

clint forrester dynamic portfolio website sliding navigation

So why would you want to use hidden navigation? Well the example on Clint Forrester’s portfolio provides a good starting point. It will save you room on the screen which is very important on a 320px portrait iPhone view. Plus visitors will be able to scroll down through the site without a nav menu so it’s much less important compared to a multi-page website.

clean personal portfolio james mcgill

If you don’t want to use a larger menu take a look at how James McGill designed his portfolio. The menu link is always accessible yet only uses small icons and some brief text descriptions. Almost all of the content is accessible right from the page so the menu isn’t all that important. But it’s very useful if you want to include some off-site links such as your social profiles or personal blog.

Clean Minimalism

The simplest technique for creating a usable single page portfolio is clarity and minimalism. That doesn’t mean you should only stick to white colors and contrasting text. Instead just try to strip down the layout into absolute necessities. Once you’ve got a wireframe or mockup design then go back to add extra fancy icons or text effects.

alicia harris clean minimalist fullscreen portfolio

I think the portfolio of Alicia Harris uses the technique of minimalism brilliantly. Her website still uses a lot of color and the top-right navigation also has some neat icons. But it also uses plenty of whitespace and clearly readable text. It’s got the bare necessities and just the simple bare necessities(cue Jungle Book soundtrack).

gabe abadilla dark minimal portfolio website

Gabe Abadilla has a portfolio which seems a bit more detailed. He uses a fixed header along with some big images. But his portfolio is really focused on simplicity, demonstrating his work and his talents. This is the most important part of any portfolio. People want to hire you because you do amazing work – everything else about you is still important but shouldn’t take a primary seat at the throne above work samples.

I’m sure there are many other tips you could apply to build a magnificent single-page website. Just keep in mind that you’re selling yourself and more importantly, your talents. One webpage should be enough to do so if you organize content conservatively. Along with the examples in this post feel free to share other single-page portfolios and your thoughts on what makes them so great.


Advertise here with BSA

New Post has been published on Vdoop.com

New Post has been published on http://vdoop.com/ur-of-the-chaldees-a-virtual-vision-of-woolleys-excavations/

Ur of the Chaldees: a virtual vision of Woolley’s excavations

Birger Helgestad, Project Curator, Ur Project, British Museum

An almost 4,000-year-old fired clay relief depicting a nude hero. One of a pair of reliefs made from the same mould (British Museum 1924.0920,74)

An almost 4,000-year-old fired clay relief depicting a nude hero. One of a pair of reliefs made from the same mould (British Museum 1924.0920,74)

I am responsible for managing the digitisation of objects and archives for the Ur Project, a dynamic new collaboration between the British Museum and Penn Museum made possible with the lead support of the Leon Levy Foundation. The project takes the successful cooperation of the two organisations of the 1920s and 1930s at Ur into the 21st century, digitally reunifying the remarkable finds from that site in a state-of-the-art website. We are photographing and documenting all the finds from Ur in our collections, from small pieces of broken pots to ancient cuneiform texts and exquisite gold jewellery. We are also digitising the original excavation photographs, archives, plans and other documents. Our resource will bring together these varied sources of information for the first time and make them available in an online database that will preserve the complete finds and records in digital formats for posterity.

Leonard Woolley excavating an almost 4,000-year-old votive figurine in the shrine of Hendursag (1930–­31)

Leonard Woolley excavating an almost 4,000-year-old votive figurine in the shrine of Hendursag (1930–­31)

Katharine Woolley and Sheikh Hamoudi Ibn Ibrahim, the excavation’s foreman, sorting finds (1928­–29 season.

Katharine Woolley and Sheikh Hamoudi Ibn Ibrahim, the excavation’s foreman, sorting finds (1928­–29 season).

Ur was an important city throughout Mesopotamian history. The excavations, led by Sir Leonard Woolley and jointly sponsored by the British Museum and the Penn Museum, uncovered its famous ziggurat complex, areas of densely packed private houses, and the spectacular Royal Graves with rich inventories of gold and evidence of human sacrifice. These unique finds provide crucial information about third-millennium society, as well as the warfare, music, food, drink, and customs of the period. We can also learn much about the people that lived and died in this city through the study of the cuneiform tablets excavated at the site. There are about 10,000 of these ancient texts from Ur in the partner museums’ collections.

A page from an excavation notebook describing 'Private Grave 91'. We are digitising tens of thousands of pages such as the one depicted here.

A page from an excavation notebook describing ‘Private Grave 91′. We are digitising tens of thousands of pages such as the one depicted here.

By 1922–34 Woolley had developed his methods with an increased emphasis on recording. Thus, the vast scale of the finds he recovered – numbering into the tens of thousands – are contextualised by an abundance of documentation. The British Museum houses the core part of this documentation, such as the original glass-plate negative photographs, and the excavation diaries. We are digitising, indexing, and cross-referencing these indispensable resources.

The most exiting aspect of the project is the rare opportunity it provides to reunify dispersed information. Not only will the collections from the three museums (the British Museum, Penn Museum and the Iraq Museum) be integrated, but also the different categories of object brought together in one virtual space, and, crucially, barriers between object data and archives will be broken down.

A Sumerian schoolboy’s practice tablet with proverbs on one side and rough workings from a maths lesson on the back (multiple views). On study loan to the British Museum from the Iraq Museum.

A Sumerian schoolboy’s practice tablet with proverbs on one side and rough workings from a maths lesson on the back (multiple views). On study loan to the British Museum from the Iraq Museum.

Our website will present for the first time an authoritative set of high resolution images of the entirety of the finds, integrated with all field notes, catalogue records, photos, reports, maps, letters and publications. Importantly, data are recorded in a format that allows them to be fully indexable and extractable, enabling people to create their own datasets and make comparisons with their own research. This approach will also allow us to re-establish lost object identifications and crucial findspot information. We will relate internal references between notes, letters, publications and catalogues, connect artefacts to their findspots on maps, and link wherever possible to other resources with the goal of enabling researchers to analyse the site in exciting new ways. All data are thoroughly cross-referenced, facilitating the study of artefacts all the way from excavation context to current display.

Activity is currently underway at the British Museum and at Penn Museum. We hope soon to be joined by our colleagues at the Iraq Museum. Our work feeds into the shared project website, as well as each museum’s own collection database. Our web resource will eliminate traditional barriers between institutions, enabling people to focus on the material from Ur as a single corpus, disregarding the objects’ current locations. We hope that our approach will inspire the digitisation of other similarly dispersed collections.

The project staff bring expertise in archives, photography, programming, conservation, Assyriology and archaeology. This range of skills reflects the diversity of information being collated, and indicates the great potential for research our resource provides. I look forward to bringing you future updates about the project as it progresses.

Dr Gareth Brereton investigating a terracotta relief from Ur

Dr Gareth Brereton investigating a terracotta relief from Ur

Birger Helgestad is joined on the project team by Jon Taylor, Gareth Brereton, Nadia Linder and Duygu Camurcuoglu. The co-directors at the British Museum are the Keeper of the Department of the Middle East, Jonathan Tubb, and Irving Finkel. The co-directors at Penn Museum are Richard L Zettler and Stephen J Tinney, leading a team comprising William B Hafford, Sasha Renninger, Tessa de Alarcon, Ryan Placchetti, and Shannon Advincula.

The Ur Project is supported by the Leon Levy Foundation

New Post has been published on Vdoop.com

New Post has been published on http://vdoop.com/daily-inspiration-1819/

Daily Inspiration #1819

Daily Inspiration #1819

This post is part of our daily series of posts showing the most inspiring images selected by some of the Abduzeedo’s writers and users. If you want to participate and share your graphic design inspiration, You can submit your images and inspiration to RAWZ via http://raw.abduzeedo.com and don’t forget to send your Abduzeedo username; or via Twitter sending to http://twitter.com/abduzeedo

AoiroStudio

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

DesignYouTrust

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Fabio

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Fabiano

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Linxspiration

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Signalstarr

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

The Earth Has Music For Those Who Listen

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Send your suggestions via Twitter to http://twitter.com/abduzeedo using #abdz in the end of the tweet.

FromUpNorth

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Send your RAWZ suggestions via Raw.Abduzeedo.com

abaanya

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Adha Orio

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

artandcrime

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Besim Hakramaj

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Chris Fernandez

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

daniel Coelho

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Garden Estúdio

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

hyfroy

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

inspirationde

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

jasonwstanley

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Joshua Phillips

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

katherine-dawson

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

luxuryaccommodations

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

masterfgh

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

mateyboy

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Mike

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Nick Taylor

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

patrickdenobrega

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Patrick Doyle

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Pendora’s Box

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

phil wade

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

PhotoTop

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

REK

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Renato Cunha

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

risewithlove

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

romulocavilia

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Ryan Rittenhouse

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Sean Kinnear

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Steven Rohl

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

studioministry

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

tecnohaus

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

WhatAnArt

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Digital art selected for the Daily Inspiration #1819

Brought to you by: 



New Post has been published on Vdoop.com

New Post has been published on http://vdoop.com/new-gear-hoya-evo-antistatic-filters-repel-dust-and-dirt/

New Gear: Hoya EVO Antistatic Filters Repel Dust and Dirt

Hoya EVO antistatic filters

New coatings also make them resistant to water and scratches

When it comes to filters, it’s actually the coatings on the outside of the glass that can make a huge difference in performance. Hoya‘s newest filters have some brand new coatings that they claim bring a few different improvements.

The filters are treated with antistatic material, which means it won’t hold onto dust and dirt like some filters do. If you’ve ever looked down at the front of your lens and found it a speckled wreck, you know how handy that could be if it’s as effective as they claim. It’s also resistant to water, stains, and scratches.

Second, they also claim that they have improved light transmission from 99.7% of light to 99.8%. The numbers make it sound a bit hilarious, but when it comes to letting in light, every little bit counts. They also claim to have 100% transmission at some wavelengths.

You can get the filters in Protector (a clear filter meant just for protection), UV, and circular polarizer in sizes from 37mm all the way up to 82mm.

Hoya EVO antistatic filters
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

Hoya EVO antistatic filters

read more



New Post has been published on Vdoop.com

New Post has been published on http://vdoop.com/800-free-high-quality-photos-all-in-one-place/

800+ Free High-Quality Photos All in One Place

You may have noticed our love of free photos. We write about the topic quite often. And we even give out a few free photos ourselves (you can find them in our freebies section). Continue reading…

Continue Reading: 800+ Free High-Quality Photos All in One Place